Archives For Service

by Rev. Victoria Rebeck

Since deacons lead the church’s ministry to the world–and most especially to people who are usually overlooked or disdained–we are challenged to find new ways to minister alongside them. The old assumption that “if you build it, they will come” to a worship service or church building has long been proven outdated.

Deacons, with our emphasis on building relationships with the oppressed and sending the faithful out into ministries of justice and compassion, are the forerunners of the Good News and the church’s mission (should the church choose to accept it!).

Deacons find they need to develop ever new ways to meet and serve the marginalized, and send God’s people to do likewise. And United Methodist deacons are creating some inspiring new ministries.

The General Board of Higher Education and Ministry provides Emerging Ministry grants every year to new ministries developed by deacons to reach an underserved community and empower laypeople for ministry. We receive a number of excellent proposals and struggle to choose finalists. The agency wishes it had the funds to assist all applicants.

This year’s recipients:

Multitudes Food Truck Ministry
Deacon Christina Ruehl
New Hope Covenant UMC, Savannah, Ga.

Rev. Christina Ruehl

Drawing on the popularity of food trucks, New Covenant UMC will prepare meals in the church kitchen and transport them in a food truck to food-insecure neighborhoods. They aim to feed people where they are and build community among the guests. Christina, along with the church’s elder, will empower laypeople for leadership in the ministry.

They are inviting local chefs, the Chatham Savannah Authority for the Homeless and the Savannah Food Truck Association to partner with them. They will also invite unchurched neighbors who would not enter a church but who want to help others to assist the ministry.

“We hope to create hospitable environments for sharing a meal together with dignity, a value not offered to the homeless population, and with others of different socioeconomic status, also a rare occurrence in modern-day society,” Christina writes in her application. The church anticipates serving 300 meals per month.

The typical soup-kitchen model, Christina notes, “sets up an unfair, patriarchal system that forces participants to obtain transportation as well as swallow their pride in accepting a free meal. I believe the Multitudes food truck ministry can offer compassion and justice with every meal, thus restoring the pride and hope of every homeless person we encounter.”

Reconciler Addiction and Recovery Advocacy
Deacon Adam Burns
UM Church of the Reconciler, Birmingham, Ala.

Rev. Adam Burns

Church of the Reconciler (COTR) assists its impoverished neighbors, including those with substance addiction, to transition from the streets to self-sufficiency. The more well-to-do in the area consider the ministry participants to be “dirty, lazy, and violent,” Adam notes. The Addiction Recovery and Advocacy ministry will use an appreciative inquiry approach to train those in recovery to lead presentations about addiction and teach neighborhood organizations how to support recovery programs.

“The purpose of the ministry is to reveal the beauty, intelligence, and creativity of the COTR community while meeting a need of our local community,” Adam says in his application. “By empowering the men and women of the COTR community to address the hurt caused by addiction and to share the love of God and hope found in Christ Jesus, I will continue to fulfill my call as a deacon.”

The ministry will work with a representative of the National Institute on Drug Abuse to create a 30- to 45-minute presentation that will accurately define addiction, reveal effective treatment options, and identify local services that can help. COTR community members, particularly those in recovery, will receive training to deliver the presentation to churches and downtown businesses.

“I can think of no better messenger of hope than the men and women of COTR,” Adam says. “Through the very act of presenting they will not only educate their audience but the will demonstrate the grace of God and hope found in recovery.

“It will also give purpose to homeless and low-income men and women of COTR who are desperately looking for ways to give back.”

Naivapeace
Deacon Jerioth Wangeci Gichigi
Trinity UMC, Naivasha, Kenya

Rev. Jerioth Wangeci Gichigi

Kenya’s elections are marked by profound conflict that can erupt into violence. This is particularly true in the Naivasha District. Deacon Jerioth Wangeci Gichigi of Trinity UMC is one of the leaders of Naivapeace, which send church leaders to preach and teach peace and reconciliation to gatherings in conflicted neighborhoods.

Though the elections were held on August 8, 2017, Naivapeace has a two-year strategy to reach every ward in the district. Given that on Sept. 1, the Kenya Supreme Court ruled the election invalid and in violation of the constitution, Naivapeace’s ministry continues to be urgent.

“Naivasha constituency has 42 tribes represented, and we all vote differently,” Jerioth says in her application. “In 2007, it was the area affected most by violence–1,300 were killed and many displaced. This year’s election is similar to that of 2007 and the country is as divided as it was.”

Jerioth will be preaching in the wards and training leaders to extend the peacemaking ministry further.

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Emerging Ministry Grants are offered annually, Applications are available after Jan. 1 and due July 1. Provisional and full-member deacons as well as diaconal ministers may apply. After Jan. 1, write to the office of deacons and diaconal ministers to request an application.

Victoria Rebeck is director of deacon ministry support, certification programs, and provisional membership development for the United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

 

 

 

 

 

By Rev. Lois Rogers-Watson

Many thanks to the Board of Higher Education and Ministry for the financial help I received toward attending the DOTAC 2015 meeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil! What a rich experience it was!

Lois Rogers-Watson

Lois Rogers-Watson

Highlights of the Conference for me were several. First of all, the worship was deeply spiritual. It was well planned and executed. Our music leader was exceptionally fine and the chosen music was not only beautiful and easy to sing but it was theologically sound, in my humble opinion. Naturally, we servant leaders identified with the call to serve and to work for justice about which both the music and the liturgy spoke.

The evening worship services led by Lutherans were truly beautiful. We United Methodists could learn from the liturgies of other denominations. Our Anglican heritage speaks to me and I yearn at times for the orders of the day. In our personal devotions, my husband and I have a somewhat “order of the day” that is both challenging and satisfying.

Another highlight was the fellowship. To sit at a table with the same people for the entire conference was very special because one felt that you became a community and I appreciated each of my tablemates very much. They were diverse and yet we had so much in common. I came to love these people! Each is obviously a devoted disciple of Christ and each works in different but wonderful ways in their home communities. We only had one Portuguese person at our table and it would have enhanced our fellowship to have another but our dear sister was so lovely and I came to identify with her at a deep level.

Likewise, to interact at meal times with conference participants was special as well. Those of us who did the site visits together also had the opportunity to develop relationships through our shared experiences there.

The site visits were, indeed, a highlight. Our first site was similar but not the same as Ronald McDonald Houses in the USA. This site was more modest but certainly faith-based and that came through in several ways. Operated on a shoestring, it is providing housing for those awaiting transplants and/or checkups following transplants. The director is loving and enthusiastic about her work. The second site was the “Bread Project,” which is also exciting. Youth from distressed neighborhoods spend half a day three days a week at this project. They learn to bake and they learn computer skills. In addition, they take far-reaching field trips which expand their horizons beyond their neighborhoods and city. The staff at this site is very fine and well-skilled. They receive government funding and I pray that will continue because it is making a huge difference in the lives of these young people. While we were there a mother came to enroll her child because she has seen the results of the program in the lives of youth she knows. It, too, is faith-based and it is located in a church which gives not only space to it but also spiritual support.

The speakers were also inspiring. It happens I have not been in many situations where I needed translation and I found that to be an excellent experience. My language skills, despite some language study, are very, very poor outside the English language and I am humbled by those who are fluent in various languages beyond their native ones.

Lois Rogers-Watson stands by the UMC Deacons banner used in the opening processional at the DOTAC conference.

Lois Rogers-Watson stands by the UMC Deacons banner used in the opening processional at the DOTAC conference.

The content of the talks by these able speakers spoke to my heart. They underscored readings that I have recently done and just reaffirmed my commitment to justice activities. So many are eating bread crumbs in our world today! So many don’t even get the crumbs. We must take back the Kingdom in our churches and help our churches see that our call is to be counter-cultural. Fortunately, my current pastor gets that to some extent and I know I am looked to as the speaker for social justice. But, I need to be even a stronger voice and this conference helped equip me in that role.

It was my privilege to present a workshop on Israel and Palestine at the conference. Though attendance was light at the workshop, I pray that attendees saw the injustices of the occupation of Palestine and left with a determination to learn more and to speak out for the Palestinian people while at the same time praying for the Israeli government to change its ways.

Finally, while in the country of Brazil, friends and I took advantage of some travel after the conference. We went to Iguacu Falls, Salvador, and Rio de Janeiro. Since Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world, we hardly saw a speck of it but nonetheless we learned a great deal from the various guides we had and the other people with whom we interacted. It was our privilege to meet Diana, a lovely young Methodist woman, in Salvador. All with whom we talked were discouraged by the corruption of their government and some of the stories they shared were not unlike things happening in the United States. It is time for the crumbs to become full communion in Brazil, the United States, and the world at large!

Many thanks again for helping make my pilgrimage possible. It was deeply spiritually, culturally, and socially enhancing and I thank God for it.
Rev. Rogers-Watson is a retired deacon and retired home missionary serving in East Lake United Methodist Church, Palm Harbor, Florida. She is a Stephen Minister and is involved in justice ministries on the local level and also an active advocate for ending the occupation of Palestine. She is a member of the Indiana Conference and an associate member of the Florida Conference.

By Rev. Amelia Boomershine

Jesus talked a lot about the kingdom of God. One time he asked a rhetorical question: What is the kingdom of God like?

He answered with the parable of the mustard seed. So we named our emerging ministry project “Seeds of Grace.” The Seeds of Grace team leads a weekly Circle of the Word program called “Sacred Stories” for women at the Montgomery County (Ohio) Jail in downtown Dayton. In these Circles I experience the kingdom of God when stories of a deeply personal nature are shared in the safe place that our Sacred Stories Circle becomes as we creatively engage biblical stories.

Amelia Boomershine

Amelia Boomershine

We had a full room for our first Circle of this past summer: three of us from Grace United Methodist Church (Dayton) and eleven from the jail. The two suggestions for connecting to the story of “Hagar Conceives a Son” (Gen. 16:1-6) were invitations to tell about “someone you know who couldn’t have a baby, or a time you were treated with contempt.” I started with a story about a friend who couldn’t have a baby. Then all but one of the others chose to speak on that connection. Every situation described was unique, including recognition that sometimes the issue is with the man and a story to illustrate. The woman who chose the contempt theme shared an experience much like that of Sarah and Hagar. Some of the stories were sad; some had happy endings; all were poignant.

In these times of sharing I sometimes feel like Jesus reaching out to touch a leper, getting in touch with deep sorrow, pain, shame.

Monday Morning Prayer Group supports Circle of the Word participants through prayer.

Monday Morning Prayer Group supports Circle of the Word participants through prayer.

But I am not Jesus, and initially was not sure I could shoulder the burden of these troubles in a helpful and healthy way. As Gregory Boyle asks in his book on ministry with gangbangers in L.A., “How do those who ‘sit in darkness’ find the light? How does one hang in there with folks, patiently taking from the wreck of a lifetime of internalized shame, a sense that God finds them (us) wholly acceptable?” I’m convinced that internalizing certain stories from the Bible in a creative, safe atmosphere is one approach to answering these questions.

Another approach developed as I considered how church members might participate in the Seeds of Grace project besides those who join me as Circlekeepers in the jail. Out of this came the prayer card activity. At the close of each Circle the women are invited to write prayer requests or just their names on an index card, if they would like Grace’s Monday morning prayer group to pray for them. Most accept the invitation and write with sincerity and concentration. Sometimes they write their own prayers or express gratitude for the prayer group. Occasionally a request will be dictated to a Circlekeeper if writing is too much of a challenge.

After reading and praying with the cards myself, I pass them on to the Grace prayer group. On Monday morning prayer group participants begin their hour of prayer by reading aloud each prayer card. They conclude the reading of each card with, “Lord in your mercy, hear our prayer.” The person who reads the card will take it home and pray over it daily during the week. The prayer group has been doing this ministry for over a year—every week Sacred Stories Circle is held. It is a boundary-crossing spiritual experience for members of the prayer group, as well as for those of us physically going into the jail. Several Circlekeepers are also in the prayer group.

Grace’s senior pastor, Rev. Sherry L. Gale, is a member of the prayer group and has observed how the cards have impacted it: “Through the prayer ministry for the women, our Grace prayer group has connected with a world outside themselves. This connection has brought a growth in the prayer group participants’ understanding and experience of God’s love and God’s people.” For myself, I have learned as never before the importance of local church spiritual practice. I am grateful to have been shown a way to mobilize that practice in response to the needs of women in the jail.

Rev. Amelia Cooper Boomershine is appointed to GoTell Communications, Inc., and Grace United Methodist Church (Dayton, Ohio). Seeds of Grace received an Emerging Ministries grant through the United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry for projects developed by deacons. Visit Circle of the Word to follow the Sacred Stories jail ministry and to learn how to start one in your community.

Mission Scott jpg

 

by Rev. Scott Parrish

Recently, I’ve been struggling with a question: How are we actively assisting young adults in our sphere of influence to find their place in the United Methodist global mission movement?

I confess I find it easy to get locked in on my everyday tasks, and sometimes lose the long-term importance of actively engaging the next generation in service. As I start a new year, I’m looking for more chances to share the mission. We deacons may be the key to getting the word out and involving young adults in service.

The United Methodist Church offers many mission opportunities for young adults ages 18 to 30. Imagine if at least two or three young adults from each conference were to take up this call! Since deacons should be at the front line of mission, with one foot firmly in the church and one foot firmly in the world, it is particularly important that we are advocates for our connectional mission.

Here are some opportunities to communicate to your church’s young adults:

Generation Transformation offers great options in mission for young adults. Deadlines are quickly approaching, so get the word out right away. The opportunities range from Global Justice Volunteers (two months) to Global Mission Fellows (two years). The service locations can be in the United States or elsewhere in the world. Individual volunteer opportunities are open to all ages (yes, we want everyone involved in mission). Let’s focus specifically on young adults.

Global Justice Volunteers come from all over the world and sent to almost anywhere in the world to serve for two months, June to August. These young adults between the ages of 18 and 30 serve in settings where they can explore the links between faith and social justice. This program gives the volunteers the opportunity to develop new skills, learn from local experts, and channel their passion to help build just communities.

Global Mission Fellows serve two years and engage in a range of work, including ministries with children and youth, community and congregational development, leadership development, ministry with the poor, social justice, and more. International placements depend on language skills. Those with strong second-language abilities often do more specialized work.

There are currently 87 young adult missionaries serving in 20 countries. General Board of Global Ministries wants to grow this number and needs our help!

Here’s what some young adults have said about their time in mission service:

“Generation Transformation gives you a space to grow and an opportunity to become part of something bigger than yourself. . . . This is the perfect way to ignite your faith and transform yourself and the world around you. I have learned that often the mission we think we’re doing is not always the mission God is working on.” Jerrica Becker, Global Mission Fellow US-2 Track 2012-2014. Home: Oklahoma. Placement: Murphy Harpst Children’s Center, Cedartown, Georgia.

“Young-adult mission opportunities are just starting to bloom in our Central Conference, and I am encouraging young people to discern their call for mission. It was often hard to know that my enthusiasm for mission was not widely shared in the UMC in my country. Part of me would say that I am in the Global Mission Fellows program so that I can be a living testimony and encouragement to young people in the Philippines to apply and do as I have done.” Joy Eva Bohol, Global Mission Fellow International Track 2013-2015. Home: Cebu City, Philippines. Placement: Centro Popular Para America Latina en Comunicación (CEPALC) in Bogotá, Colombia.

As deacons well know, service is transformational both for those served and those who serve!

There are a number of great Generation Transformation resources that engagingly tell the story of young adults in mission:

Introduction to Generation Transformation video (one minute)

Generation Transformation: Transforming Lives video (two minutes): GT alumni tell how their experiences changed their outlook and their lives.

Generation Transformation web site: At this information-rich site find videos and a Generation Transformation Toolkit that includes ready-to-print brochures, sermon starter, fliers, FAQs, etc.

Use these resources, and feel free to contact me. I can help you in your work of mission in your conference and jurisdiction.

Scott Parrish is a deacon and clergy member of North Georgia Annual Conference. He is mission specialist, Connectional Ministries, for North Georgia Conference and a mission strategist for General Board of Global Ministries. For North Georgia, he serves as coach, networker, and trainer in mission. For GBGM he assists churches and districts with mission celebrations as a strategy to communicate opportunities and launch into a new year of service in following Christ. His ministry is to inspire, engage, equip, and deploy more people in mission as they take the next step of faith following in the way of Christ.

By Rev. Amy Aspey

In his blog Do Less, Live More, Terry Hershey recounts this memorable Communion moment:

As Alan Jones celebrated Eucharist one Sunday, in San Francisco’s Grace Cathedral, he couldn’t help but notice a young man standing at the very back of the sanctuary. His clothing (atypical of “church attire”) and his uneasy demeanor gave him away. Alan could not tell if the visitor was entering, or wanting to leave.

Even so, the young man stood against the back wall for the entire service. As members of the congregation processed to the altar for the bread and wine, the young man waited, unmoved, at the back wall. His curiosity piqued, Alan made a point to seek out the young man. In conversation he learned that this young man lived on the city streets, that life had been unforgiving, and is now fighting a most formidable foe, AIDS. “We’re glad you are here,” Alan told him. “But why did you stay in the back of the church? Why didn’t you come down to the table for communion?”

“I didn’t think I would be allowed in,” the young man replied. (“Where Do We Hear the Voice of Grace?,” July 22, 2014).

Haven’t we all been there? An outsider looking in. Unsure if we belong. Feeling left out. Longing for an invitation. Playing the comparison game (me/them) and always coming up short. How many people in our communities and world are wondering, “Are we allowed in?”

Rev. Amy Aspey

Rev. Amy Aspey

Some of our predecessors in servant ministry (perhaps in a way the start of the Order of Deacon), Stephen and his co-workers, invited people in by extending Christ’s table out (see Acts 6:1-7). You may be thinking, where is the Table in this story? There is no specific mention of the Eucharist. I don’t believe, however, that when the Church responds to those in need, this can ever be separated from the holy feast. Perhaps, we could think of the seven’s ministry as being charged to become “living table leaves,” living extensions, in and of the Communion table.

When I was growing up, whenever our family had a large family meal, my mom always asked my dad, “Did you put the leaf in the table?”

It was critical to be sure that the extra space was added so that there was room for our guests. The leaves, those extra sections, extended the existing table so that others could join the feast.

Similarly, the heart of a deacon’s call is to live sacramentally. Ministry to those in need within the church and into the world can’t be separated from Christ’s ministry to us around his Table. Acts of compassion and justice are not separate from the Table; they are best understood as an extension of the Table.

In the text, it’s telling for our understanding of servant ministry that the seven are chosen to serve in a compassionate response to injustice. There was a growing racial tension within the church, which resulted in neglect of the poor. The Message phrases Acts 6:1-2 this way: “As the disciples were increasing in numbers by leaps and bounds, hard feelings developed among the Greek-speaking believers—“Hellenists”—toward the Hebrew-speaking believers because their widows were being discriminated against in the daily food lines.” People were being left out. Differences were becoming divisive. Leaves were needed in Christ’s Table because people were having trouble living the connections between the Communion table and the kitchen table.

While proclaiming the Word was not initially an aspect of this ministry, it didn’t take long before Stephen and others were known for preaching and miracles. Perhaps, this was because it is impossible to care for the poor, to love the neglected, to offer hope to the marginalized without proclaiming the Word. The Gospel of Jesus is always good news to the poor.

In our culture that kowtows to VIP titles, celebrates climbing the corporate ladder, clamors to be part of exclusive clubs, and measures worth by material possessions, the values of Christ’s table are confusing. Extravagant grace, radical love, transforming forgiveness and open-to-all are counter-cultural. When I began to understand deacon ministry as a means for extending Christ’s Table everything changed. All of the many beautiful ways of “doing”–creating community partnerships, leading teams in mission, serving in clothing rooms, sitting at a bedside in a mental hospital, preaching in prison, connecting our community to a Freedom School, equipping people in endless ways to live out their commitment as disciples of Jesus, when my heart bridged the serving with the sacrament–these acts of “doing” became a means for being and re-presenting Christ in the world.

When we understand our ministry as living leaves, which extend Christ’s table, acts of compassion and justice become the bread of life and the hungry are fed. Works of mercy and dignity become the cup of hope for those who are thirsty and the parched are renewed. Living out the vows of Word, Service, Compassion and Justice become the means by which additional places are set and each place card reads the name, beloved child of God.

May our servant ministry forever extend Christ’s Table out so all may know they are welcomed and invited to join us.

Rev. Amy Aspey, a deacon who is director of clergy leadership development for the West Ohio Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church, preached this sermon to the Provisional Member Deacon Formation Event in October 2014.

They dress and look like their neighbors. But within their human appearance, deacons are empowered by the Holy Spirit to help transform the world into the realm of God.

They are more than meets the eye.

The Rev. Nick Nicholas never tires of seeing the result of combining his love of ministry and a passion for justice.

“You just know you’ve done something right when God, through the Holy Spirit, opens a person’s eyes to see things they ordinarily would not see,” he says.

TransformeriStockBrendanHunter

@iStock.com/Brendan Hunter

Nick is a deacon residing in Philadelphia who serves as coordinator of United Methodist Volunteers in Mission (VIM) in the Northeastern Jurisdiction. His secondary appointment is with at Arch Street United Methodist Church.

He is one of the deacons featured in the article “Deacons show Christ to a hurting world” in the Sept.-Oct. 2014 issue of The Interpreter magazine (the source of the above quote).

A number of other deacons are featured in this issue, which focuses on ministry in the United Methodist Church. It shows the breadth of ministry leadership that deacons provide.

Dr. Margaret Ann Crain speaks in another article in that issue about the ways deacons lead United Methodists in the denominational mission of transforming the world:

“One of the gifts of the order of deacon is that they have permission to stay focused on the ministry of all Christians and the transformation of the world,” says the Rev. Margaret Ann Crain, professor emeritus of Christian education at Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary and author of The United Methodist Deacon (Abingdon, 2014). “Because deacons are not focused on ordering the church, they have the freedom to focus elsewhere, specifically on the transformation of the world—or, to put it another way, to participate in bringing to fruition the reign of God. Deacons are always looking for opportunities to connect resources and people to needs in the wounded creation.”

Check out the issue and consider ordering extra copies for your ministry of helping people discern their ministry callings (whether those are lay or clergy callings).

By Rev. Donnie Shumate Mitchem

I am an ordained deacon in the Western North Carolina Conference. I am in primary appointment as a psychologist who works with adolescents with mental health diagnoses in a Title One middle school (over 75 percent of the children in the school receive free or reduced- price lunch).

What place do I have in ordained ministry?

This was the question that I struggled with for years. I felt a call into the ministry; I would spend hours looking

Donnie Mitchem (third from right) joined other deacons on the 2014 Wesley Pilgrimage in England, led by the General Board of Discipleship.

Donnie Mitchem (third from right) joined other deacons on the 2014 Wesley Pilgrimage in England, led by the General Board of Discipleship.

at seminaries on line and then delete my viewing history because I did not want anyone else seeing this! But I did not feel that my call was to lead a church and to preach every week. Because of this I spent many years just thinking I was crazy and that there was no way that God was calingl me into the ordained ministry. Then through a series of unfortunate events, job loss, worries and lots of prayer I found myself in the office of Kathleen Kilbourne at Pfeiffer University reading paragraph 328 in the Book of Discipline: “Deacons fulfill servant ministry in the world and lead the Church in relating the gathered life of Christian to their ministries in the world . . .and lead the congregations in interpreting the needs, concerns and hopes of the world.” Ministry does not just have to happen in the church! My heart soared!

But wait—is this really ministry?

I went to seminary, I studied, I went to district committees on ministry and Boards of Ordained Ministry and passed tests and exams. But for a part of that time I think I felt like I “wasn’t a real minister.” I wasn’t working in the church like many of my colleagues and I wanted to defend my status or try to make myself legitimate to others in the ministry. Through prayer and reading and seeking God’s direction, I am now able to see my work ALL my work as ministry. A pivotal turning point was hearing Adam Hamilton speak about Church of the Resurrection and how they write letters and pray for teachers in their area. I felt a little spark inside me. This is something I could make happen in my community. Could it be that my call is to connect the church to the school? Is this even possible in this day and age?

And so it began

Today, I still get up five days a week and go to school and do individual therapy, group therapy, and family therapy. But I go to a school where every teacher receives cards from church members saying they are praying for them; this has been happening for three years. I go to a school where every sixth grader gets a book bag filled with school supplies that church members have packed and prayed over. I go to a school where we church members have cleaned the desks in the classrooms and prayed for the teacher and students who meet in those rooms.

Donnie Michem and children 2014 croppped

Donnie with children served by the church.

I now know that my distinct call is to connect the church that I worship in to this school that is less than a mile from our church. My church states that it wants to be a beacon for Christ in our community. To do this the church must go out into that community and find the needs in that community.

One story of transformation

One of the many things that I lead the church in doing is showing faith-related movies on Friday nights throughout the school year. We provide dinner, a movie and discussion. While I was cleaning up after we showed the film Unconditional, a parent came up to me and said, “Thank you so much for this movie.” “You’re welcome; glad you came,” I responded. But then she said “No, you don’t understand. God drew me here to hear this message. My husband died last year. This year my son died. I did not have any hope in the world and God drew me here to hear this message.” God uses this ministry in the cafeteria of a local school to draw people back to him.

Yes, this really is ministry

God calls the deacon out into the world to do ministry in ways that others are maybe confused about. But God calls us still. God calls us to use distinct gifts to lead the world to a Christ that heals, loves, and provides hope. Deacons who are called to do ministry beyond the walls of the church may struggle for a bit to try and see how they fit into the picture. You will have to stop and explain your ministry a few thousand times. But I believe that there is a place for us in the picture. It may require us taking a step back and looking at things a little differently but when we are faithful to God’s call GREAT things for the Kingdom happen.

Donnie’s secondary appointment is to Christ United Methodist Church in Charlotte, N.C.