Archives For Advocacy

A Deacon’s Eye for Writing

Deacons —  June 14, 2017

by Rev. Darryl W. Stephens

How might writing augment your ministry as a deacon, leading congregations in interpreting the needs, concerns, and hopes of the world (Discipline 2016, para. 328)?

Rev. Darryl Stephens

We live in a world awash with words. Facebook posts, Twitter feeds, the 24-hour news cycle, countless websites, and books on every topic imaginable—anyone with anything to say, it seems, can contribute to the cacophony. Why, then, would a deacon choose to write as an expression of ministry?

It is tempting to claim silence as a counter-cultural witness, to hide behind the words so often attributed to St. Francis, “Preach Jesus, and if necessary use words.” Cannot our actions be our witness?

Yet, many of the most powerful influences in our lives come through the written word. The Bible, that theologian you read in seminary who stretched your thinking, a love letter, or a thank you note—written words powerfully express ideas and feelings. Other people’s writings help us interpret our world and God, who created it. Your writing can do the same.

The written word is an exercise of leadership, helping others see what you see as you look upon the needs, concerns, and hopes of the world in light of God’s good future.

As deacons, we share a distinct perspective, seeing the world though what I have called a “deacon’s eye” for compassion and justice. You don’t have to be as eloquent as Annie Dillard (The Writing Life) or Barbara Brown Taylor (The Preaching Life) to make writing a part of your ministry. You just have to be intentional about using the written word to communicate what you see, hear, and experience in your ministry.

I offer four encouragements:

  • Writing is a spiritual discipline. Writing, like prayer and peacemaking, is a spiritual discipline. It requires intentionality and practice. There will be many distractions and impediments. Start small and grow from there. Daily writing time can include personal letters, substantive emails, blogs, newsletter articles, and more. As you write, consider how your perspective as a deacon shapes and is shaped by the words you write. I find that writing helps me better understand my own spiritual journey.
  • Writing is a form of witness. Proclamation is not just for the pulpit. Your words indicate what is important to you. As a deacon, when you write, you write not only on your own behalf but also on behalf of the church that authorizes your ministry. Writing can be a powerful, public proclamation of what motivates you in the ministry of Word, Service, Compassion, and Justice. When you write about your ministry, you can proclaim not only what you do but also why you do it. God will speak through your words. People will be inspired and challenged.
  • Writing is a tool for justice. Words perform. There is no neat distinction between words and actions. When you write, your words have effect. To motivate others for the work of justice, your words do not have to be profound, poetic, or overtly prophetic in their advocacy. Trust your call. Your deacon’s eye gives you a distinct perspective on the world around you, a viewpoint that is inherently suffused with justice. Sometimes, just drawing attention to an overlooked injustice can be enough to stir others to meaningful action.
  • Writing is an exercise of leadership. As a commissioned or ordained deacon, you have a role as a servant leader, both in your congregation and in your community. No matter your area of specialization, writing will enhance your ability to lead, connecting the church and world in ways that only God can fully anticipate or understand. The written word is an exercise of leadership, helping others see what you see as you look upon the needs, concerns, and hopes of the world in light of God’s good future.

Isn’t that worth sharing? Isn’t that worth writing about?

Darryl W. Stephens is a deacon of the Texas Annual Conference and author of many articles and books about the church and its ministry. His most recent book, Methodist Morals: Social Principles in the Public Church’s Witness (University of Tennessee Press, 2016), is accompanied by a six-session study guide. Read his commentary “Christian ethics in volatile times,” which exemplifies his use of the “deacon’s eye” in writing.

 

Deacons who are appointed beyond the local church also have appointments to a local congregation, where they are to take missional responsibility for leading other Christians into ministries of service. The Discipline does not say much about what such secondary appointments look like (¶331.5), leaving a lot of flexibility for the deacon and congregation to shape the appointment.

Plan your secondary appointment to meet your gifts, interests, and availability. If, like many deacons, you serve a demanding primary appointment beyond the local church, you certainly need not consider the secondary appointment an additional part-time job. Offer reasonable ways you can provide leadership.

Also consider entering into a secondary appointment covenant. This can confirm agreement on matters such as time commitment, office space, continuing education funds, worship participation, and more.

Here are just a few suggestions to get you thinking. Again, customize your ministry to fit your gifts, the church’s ministry priorities, and your availability.

  • Preach on occasion
  • Conduct weddings or funerals on occasion
  • Facilitate a seasonal study group (Lent, Advent, other)
  • Lead a spiritual formation group or a retreat on reflection/action
  • Assist in worship leadership/lead worship on occasion
  • Assist elder in the administration of the sacraments
  • Extend communion to those who cannot be present (see This Holy Mystery)
  • Inform the congregation about opportunities to participate in and support United Methodist missions
  • Share with the congregation (in worship, newsletter, other) prayer requests for needs in the community and world
  • Lead laypeople into a community ministry (one-time event or ongoing): food drive, disaster-relief kit drive; school-supplies drive, public-policy advocacy (contacting legislators about policy that affects those on the margins), environmental stewardship, clothing drive, mission trips, promote volunteer outreach opportunities
  • Train lay people in worship leadership practices (reading scripture, assisting with communion, etc.)
  • Serve as a chaplain at a shelter or community meal
  • Mentor and guide laypeople as they explore where God may be calling them into ministry (lay or ordained)
  • Mentor a confirmand
  • Lead a confirmation session/new membership session on discipleship & compassion ministries