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Doris Dalton E PA

Doris Dalton

by Rev. Doris K. Dalton

I am an ordained deacon serving in the Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference. I am currently serving in two deacon-elder ministry partnerships, in a primary appointment beyond the local church and in a secondary appointment developing a community of faith. Both of these appointments speak to God’s vision of ministry for me: extending God’s table of Love so that all can eat and be full.

District ministry

My primary appointment is to the Central District office in the Eastern Pennsylvania Annual Conference as district resource assistant, and I work in partnership with the district superintendent. Generally, this means I manage the district office in supporting the work and vision of the district superintendent and provide resources to the churches in the District. We have a mutually beneficial working relationship as a deacon/elder team and as colleagues.

In my primary appointment to the district office, my ministry calling is to provide resources to congregations and clergy so they are able to fulfill their ministry purposes. In this way, I am able to fulfill my desire to make disciples and servant leaders through empowering the district superintendent, clergy, and congregations. Together, we are able to model what deacon/elder partnerships are able to accomplish across a district.

First love: economic justice

My secondary appointment is to the creation of a new faith community, Plumbline Community in Philadelphia, where I work with an elder. She is a church planter who is gifted in vision and worship and has a deep sensibility on how to call communities into existence. Together, we are doing the exciting work of foundation-building and planting seeds of a new community.

Here I have many opportunities to live out my “first love” of ministry, which is economic development and justice. In planting a community of faith, I am able to speak directly to my passion to create a ministry that is able to bring positive impact to the disenfranchised and marginalized. In the visioning process for planting a community of faith, I work with the vision team in establishing justice-oriented values and theological touch points that can guide this community of faith to live within the tension of diversity, multiculturalism and interculturalism. My elder colleague in this appointment and I share many common theological starting points, and we are enthusiastic about working together in this season of our ministry journey.

I have worked in partnership with three elders so far (my first deacon-elder partnership was in a local church in an economically oppressed area of Philadelphia). In all three of these partnership experiences, I have found that successful partnerships between deacons and elders require the following factors:

  • alignment of calling and vision
  • establishing communication agreements
  • understanding and respecting roles
  • know thyself
Aligning calling & vision

Each person of the ministry partnership must embrace his or her particular calling and vision for ministry. These callings and visions for ministry do not need to match, but they do need to align in order to accomplish the ministry purposes at hand. God brings deacons and elders together for a particular ministry purpose and for a designated ministry season, where these ministry callings and visions align for a time. In each instance where I “found” my ministry partner, it was truly more of a Holy Spirit movement than anything that my partner or I did to produce the partnership.

Communication agreements

Deacon-elder partnerships also work best when we have established agreements about the importance of communication. Just like that awkward stage when relationships are beginning to bloom, my elder and I would have that “moment” where we began to be honest with each other about our needs, vulnerabilities, sensitivities, and ministry desires. These conversations can be intentionally done in the beginning or occur naturally over time; however it is important to pay attention to each other and honor communication agreements once they are established. Each partnership is unique and evolving, therefore the parameters regarding communication are different. However, the similarities in communication boundaries are many: maintain open and honest communication, tell the truth, put aside personal agendas and ego, be honest about our vulnerabilities as well as our strengths, and hold each other in love. Good and intentional communication is vital for ministry partnerships.

Respecting roles

Another important factor involves understanding and respecting roles. Each partner in the ministry team is very clear on the roles and ministry of deacons and elders, how they are similar and different, complementary yet unique. This helps each person to respect boundaries as well as invite each other to live out their ministry callings to the fullest extent for the universal benefit of the ministry partnership. We are able to celebrate our unique gifts and roles and welcome other deacons and elders around us into that celebration.

Know yourself

Finally, knowing myself and being honest with myself allows me to approach ministry partnerships and collaborations with an elder colleague with confidence in my own power, my own authority, and my own abilities. It also allows me to give myself grace for my weaknesses and vulnerabilities. Working with an elder colleague with the same confidences of her own strengths, challenges, abilities and authority means that we are able to work together without fears of being rejected, manipulated, or undermined. One of the best things I ever did was to take a training session with one of my partnering elders on understanding our conflict modes and typical patterns of action and reaction in different situations. It allowed us to finally articulate why we work together so well, giving us a greater insight of how we can continue to effectively collaborate in the future. Once we are able to understand ourselves and each other, we have a better vocabulary for informing, inspiring and inviting others into deacon-elder ministry partnerships.

For deacons who are in the process of developing healthy partnerships with elders, I recommend that you continually develop self-awareness, be your best advocate, and establish good communication practices from the beginning. Also, be forgiving of your ministry partner’s challenges, and at the same time ensure you have boundaries to keep yourself healthy and balanced.

Start shifting the culture

For those who are looking for ways to promote deacon-elder partnerships within a district or conference, there are a number of things that can be done to begin this cultural shift.

  • Establish visibility that will allow you to share information about Deacons. One way to do this is to ask Deacons to serve in their roles at communion services and worship services at annual conference or district events. As people are able to visualize deacons and elders in their roles, the ability to imagine the possibilities of deacon-elder partnerships begins to rise.
  • Use opportunities to demonstrate the roles of deacons and elders together. Eastern Pennyslvania’s Bishop Peggy Johnson always brings a deacon with her when she visits churches within the conference. This allows her to share information about the roles of deacons in ministry and invite other elders to include deacons in their worship services. District superintendents can adopt this practice as well.
  • Hold retreats and training events that focus on deepening ministry partnerships and invite deacons and elders to attend for the purpose of strengthening existing ministry partnerships and creating potential ministry partnerships. Many elders are reluctant to engage in a deacon-elder partnership because the details and responsibilities can seem daunting. Demythologizing assumptions and sharing concrete details can provide for a smoother beginning to ministry partnerships.
  • Educate leaders first. Take or make opportunities to share information with district Committees on Ordained Ministry, conference Boards of Ordained Ministry, the bishop, and Cabinet. Sign up to lead trainings at district or conference laity training events, particularly those to target Staff-Pastor-Parish Committees.

A ministry partnership between a deacon and an elder is hard work because it requires collaboration and compromise between each other, and the willingness to understand one another. However, the benefits and rewards of a ministry partnership between the deacon and elder are exponential. We are able to work with mutual support instead of in isolation. Our efforts in ministry have a wider impact because of our collaboration rather than if we were operating on our own. We can share responsibilities that play to our gifts and talents while we develop new skills. Most importantly, our work together demonstrates the church’s capacity to touch and minister to the whole need of the world around us.

Rev. Doris Dalton is a deacon in the Eastern Pennsylvania Conference, serving in the Philadelphia area. She is called to extend God’s table of Love so all can eat and be full.

Deacons who are appointed beyond the local church also have appointments to a local congregation, where they are to take missional responsibility for leading other Christians into ministries of service. The Discipline does not say much about what such secondary appointments look like (¶331.5), leaving a lot of flexibility for the deacon and congregation to shape the appointment.

Plan your secondary appointment to meet your gifts, interests, and availability. If, like many deacons, you serve a demanding primary appointment beyond the local church, you certainly need not consider the secondary appointment an additional part-time job. Offer reasonable ways you can provide leadership.

Also consider entering into a secondary appointment covenant. This can confirm agreement on matters such as time commitment, office space, continuing education funds, worship participation, and more.

Here are just a few suggestions to get you thinking. Again, customize your ministry to fit your gifts, the church’s ministry priorities, and your availability.

  • Preach on occasion
  • Conduct weddings or funerals on occasion
  • Facilitate a seasonal study group (Lent, Advent, other)
  • Lead a spiritual formation group or a retreat on reflection/action
  • Assist in worship leadership/lead worship on occasion
  • Assist elder in the administration of the sacraments
  • Extend communion to those who cannot be present (see This Holy Mystery)
  • Inform the congregation about opportunities to participate in and support United Methodist missions
  • Share with the congregation (in worship, newsletter, other) prayer requests for needs in the community and world
  • Lead laypeople into a community ministry (one-time event or ongoing): food drive, disaster-relief kit drive; school-supplies drive, public-policy advocacy (contacting legislators about policy that affects those on the margins), environmental stewardship, clothing drive, mission trips, promote volunteer outreach opportunities
  • Train lay people in worship leadership practices (reading scripture, assisting with communion, etc.)
  • Serve as a chaplain at a shelter or community meal
  • Mentor and guide laypeople as they explore where God may be calling them into ministry (lay or ordained)
  • Mentor a confirmand
  • Lead a confirmation session/new membership session on discipleship & compassion ministries

By Sue Zahorbenski

Death and taxes. Two things we can’t avoid, no matter what, no matter where.

In Germany, the churches and their many agencies and institutions are mostly supported by the government through taxes. About 8 to 9 percent of income tax supports the churches, although this may translate to only 2 percent of a taxpayer’s income. (Example:  $50,000 income, taxed at 20 percent, equals $10,000; church tax comes to $800-$900.) This allows unique and comprehensive caring for many people, as we witnessed during the World Diakonia Assembly in Berlin in July 2013.

Sue Zahorbenski visits a remaining part of the Berlin Wall on July 4, 2013.

Sue Zahorbenski visits a remaining part of the Berlin Wall on July 4, 2013.

For example, an old city church had dwindled to only 20 people in the congregation, so they went on a European search for a new model. A Swiss pastor and his wife were recruited to import their community model, including several families, to create the “Stadtkloster Segen” (City Cloister Blessing) in Berlin. After two years, they now offer Bible study and prayer, worship, breakfasts, counseling, spiritual mentoring, and more, for all who come, including visitors in their guest accommodations.

On a larger scale, the Evangelisches Johannesstift, which hosted our conference, is a huge community that offers a variety of ministries. Located on 187 acres with over 60 buildings, the campus accommodates both those who need help and those who provide help, employing about 1,900 people. The handicap-accessible bus stops at the front gate, so it is not isolated even though it’s on the outskirts of Berlin in the Spandau Forest.

At the Berlin Wall, I was touched by the story told in the Reconciliation Chapel service about a young West Berlin man who accidentally fell while peering over the wall. He was shot and killed by the East Berlin police, who told no one about the death of this innocent man. It was not until the wall came down in 1989 that this and other deaths were revealed to the public. His friends and family didn’t know what happened to him for years!

Elizabeth, one of our tour guides, may be the best example of the vim and vigor of the German deaconesses. She met our group at the train station and led us all around the city. The youngest person in her community was introduced at age 72, so we guessed that Elizabeth is probably closer to eighty. There were no golf carts on the Johannesstift campus to shuttle people from one end to the other. In the U.S., our lack of exercise may shorten our lifespan—another sobering lesson from Germany.

I was grateful for the opportunity to travel to Berlin to represent the diaconal ministers and deacons of the United Methodist Church. As one of the few diaconal ministers still working in New Jersey, it was great to meet so many from other denominations who still go by the name “diaconal minister” (though they may pronounce it “dia-KON-al”). Having attended many United Methodist Women jurisdictional and assembly meetings, I thought I had a global view of the church. The UMC is global, but now I see even more broadly. Thank you!

Sue Zahorbenski is diaconal minister at the United Methodist Church at New Brunswick (N.J.). This is a contribution to a series of reflections on the World Federation of Diakonia Assembly held in July 2013 in Berlin.

By Rev. Rick Buckingham

The Gospel of Christ knows no religion but social; no holiness but social holiness – John Wesley, Preface to Hymns and Sacred Poems (1739).

In the August issue of the United Methodist Deacon News, the Rev. Rick Tettau gave an excellent description of the theme, content, and location of the World Assembly of the World Diakonia Federation, held in Berlin, Germany, held in July 2013. To hold this event in Berlin held particular relevance in the history of the organization. World Diakonia began in 1946 in the midst of the debris of the Second World War. Much of Europe lay in ruins, and the Nazi movement had been the chief cause of the resulting horror. A residual dislike—even hatred—of Germans in general can still be identified in many parts of Europe to this day. Yet it was in 1946 that a group of Dutch deaconesses decided to reach out to their German sisters and others to rebuild the Christian bonds that had once united them. Diakonia World Federation had its roots in this act of reconciliation and healing, and was formally organized the next year in Copenhagen. The 2013 assembly is only the fourth one to be held in Germany, and the second in Berlin, the previous Berlin assembly being in 1963 in a newly divided city. To meet once again in this now unified city in a reunified Germany, under the elected leadership of President Sister Doris Horn, a native German (and a United Methodist), with the theme “Healing and Wholeness for the World,” was an especially powerful symbol for all of us.

Rev. Rick Buckingham, third from right, connects with other United Methodist deacons and diaconal ministers outside the chapel at Johannesstift.

Rev. Rick Buckingham, third from right, connects with other United Methodist deacons and diaconal ministers outside the chapel at Johannesstift.

My first exposure to World Diakonia came in 1992, at the assembly in Wolfville, Nova Scotia. I had been a United Methodist diaconal minister for almost ten years, and was aware of the movement within our denomination to create an ordained order of deacons. I wanted to learn more about diaconal work worldwide, and I was not disappointed. Meeting deacons and deaconesses and hearing their stories of call and service from around the world changed my perspective and, indeed, my identity. Prior to that assembly, I saw myself primarily in occupational and professional terms as Christian educator and youth minister; afterwards I began to see myself as a called, set-apart person in mission and ministry, with concern for the needs of the larger world. I learned about DIAKAID, the fund established in 1969 to provide direct assistance for various diaconal ministries located in areas of the greatest need, and realized that I needed to be doing more in my own place of service to educate and motivate my congregation to take action to meet such needs.

Now, 20 years later, I found myself connecting to old friends and meeting new ones: the Swedish deaconesses with whom I shared a lunch, the Australian with whom I ate breakfast, the Canadian with whom I shared a hotel room, and especially the Tanzanians with whom I struck up a particularly enjoyable relationship. A young man from my church is about to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, and I was able to send him the names of Christian friends there who could render him assistance and hospitality should he need it. Through Christ, the world comes together.

When we are willing to step outside of our comfort zones, experience people and cultures that are unfamiliar to us, and trust in the grace of God, we begin to discover what it truly means to be part of the church universal. We learn to communicate in the languages of faith and music, smiles and sharing. And when in the presence of other deacons and deaconesses and diaconal workers, we realize the powerful unifying factor of the call of Christ to serve others. When John Wesley wrote about the essence of the Gospel being social religion, and true holiness being social holiness, he had in mind what today we would call diakonia: serving by connecting the gifts of the church and the needs of the people. I now return to my workaday world rejuvenated, but also looking forward to the next opportunity I may have to be in company with others who share my call. I hope that you will consider joining me!

Rev. Rick Buckingham is minister of education and youth for St. Paul’s United Methodist Church in Kensington, Md. This is a contribution to a series of reflections on the World Federation of Diakonia Assembly held in July 2013 in Berlin.

By Rev. Jim Kraus

I first heard about the Diakonia World Federation assembly back in 2001 when it met in Australia. I was intrigued that a world community gathered every four years to encourage people in diaconal/deacon ministry. I was finally able to attend the 2013 gathering, in Berlin, and was moved and inspired through the programming, the discussions and connecting with so many from around the world.

Those in the diaconate from around the world meet at the historic Berliner Dom for worship and singing.

Those in the diaconate from around the world met at the historic Berliner Dom for worship and singing.

I loved hearing the daily chapel bells calling us to worship in the morning and the evening. I was moved to hear those bells peel as we all prayed The Lord’s Prayer in our own tongues. It was as if the bells agreed with the prayer and carried it over the community, first on the Johannesstift campus and then at the Berliner Dom.

We gathered twice in small groups, where I loved meeting people from all over the globe who serve God in so many ways and shared from their experiences. My view of ministry was widened by hearing others share of the work they are called to: a Presbyterian deacon pastor of a three-point charge from Canada, a mother superior from Tanzania, a surviving spouse who runs a ministry for the poor in Australia, and others from all types of ministry from nursing to education to administration. God’s hand is active and moving in the world.

How impressive to meet in Berlin, a city that has been destroyed by war, divided by ideology and politics, and yet has been reunited and is under constant renovation and rebuilding. This is a picture of the Church in many ways. We are separated from others only to be reunited and reclaimed by Christ and then remade. Even as Christian workers across denominations we are united in Christ.

As we exited the Berliner Dom for a final group picture the conference members and friends numbering near 500 spontaneously began singing “We Are Marching in the Light of God.” People in the park across the street ran over to see what this big group was about. Soon there were as many people looking at us as there were on the steps singing, witnessing to the goodness of God.

A presenter who spoke about Bonhoeffer included this memorable quote: “Wherever you serve God, even if you feel you are serving in the margins, you are serving in the center of God’s will.” Another speaker said, “When you are serving God, you are living your call and this service is a privilege.” How great to join with others from around the world at that moment and demonstrate the love and community of God to the world.

Rev. Jim Kraus is director of music and leadership development for First United Methodist Church in St. Joseph, Mich. This is a contribution to a series of reflections on the World Federation of Diakonia Assembly held in July 2013 in Berlin.

By Rev. Rick Tettau

 In Christ there is no east or west, in him no south or north; but one great fellowship of love throughout the whole wide earth.—William A. Dunkerly

The Berlin Wall was erected on August 13, 1961. The wall divided streets, families, friends, and whole communities. The wall cut through the heart of Berlin, dividing the city, and on a much grander scale symbolized the division of Germany and all of Europe during the time of World War II.

Our tour guide on the bus told us a story about how a community that was divided by the wall worked out an agreement to swap church buildings in an effort to maintain their congregations who were living on opposite sides of the wall. It was a solemn experience for me to attend worship at the Chapel of Reconciliation at the memorial of the Berlin Wall, where they hold service every Tuesday through Friday at noon to remember those who were killed trying to get over the wall. It broke my heart to the read the names of peaceful men and women whose lives were cut short at the Berlin Wall. To the delight and praise of the world, the Berlin Wall was opened on the night of November 9, 1989. On this day thousands of people streamed like water through the boundary and the work of healing in Germany began.

“Healing and Wholeness for the World” was the theme for the Diakonia World Assembly, held July 1-8, 2013, at Evangelishes

Rick Tettau (second from left) confers with other United Methodist deacons and diaconal ministers on the Johannesstift campus.

Rick Tettau (second from left) confers with other United Methodist deacons and diaconal ministers on the Johannesstift campus.

Johannesstift in Berlin, Germany. The Evangelishes Johannesstift is a diaconal training and ministry center that serves older adults, families with children, and people with disabilities. Evangelishes Johannesstift has served the Berlin community for over 150 years. Their purpose is based on 1 John 3:18: “Let us not love with word, neither in tongue; but in deed and truth.” Nearly 350 deacons and diaconal workers representing 37 different countries gathered for the assembly, which meets every four years.

Throughout the week we were engaged in a variety of activities. Each day opened and closed with worship. There were multiple presentations during the mornings and afternoons. Presentation included “Life is Flowering for Us All,” “God at the Margins,” “Healing and Salvation in the Work of Hildegard van Bingen,” and “Healing and Community.” Each participant was assigned to a small group of about 10 people to discuss the presentations and share experiences. The small groups were intentionally mixed by region so one received a global perspective of diakonia. World and regional meetings uplifted the ministries in which participants were engaged back home. There was a German cultural night and plenty of opportunities for sightseeing.

This was my third Diakonia World Assembly. The 2001 World Diakonia Assembly was a critical part of my spiritual formation as a deacon and it helped me prepare for my ordination interview with the Board of Ordained Ministry. Since then, I continue to make the World Assembly a part of my continuing education as a deacon. There is much to learn by attending and many great people to meet and get to know. Needless to say, it is refreshing to be around people who share a common call and vocation. You will not need to explain to anybody the purpose of diakonia or the function of a deacon, diaconal minister, or deaconess. You are among friends who understand!

Overall, I plan to keep the World Diakonia community in my thoughts and prayers until we are able to meet in person again. In the meantime, having a computer that translates different languages will help me stay connected to my colleagues and friends from around the world. I leave you with the prayer below. Use this to guide your prayers as you offer healing and wholeness to the world.

Prayer from the Chapel of Reconciliation at the Berlin Wall Memorial:

“Let us praise the Lord, who lifts up the low and tears down the mighty from his throne. He alone knows how to judge rightfully. To him let us pray, “Lord have mercy on us!”

“For all those, murdered at the Wall and its line of death, in the prisons and camps, we pray, “Lord, have mercy on us!”

“For the dead, who died of sorrow because of their destroyed families; for all, who lost their home and homeland at the boundary, we pray, “Lord, have mercy on us!”

“For all who have public responsibilities for justice, freedom, and virtue of every person, we pray, “Lord, have mercy on us!”

“For all, who influence public opinion as testimonies of truth; for all, who educate the coming generations, we pray, “Lord, have mercy on us!”

“For all, who are not able to take advantage of freedom, we pray, “Lord, have mercy on us!”

“Lord, our Father, let us take up the task of reconciliation, which you ordered us to fulfill by being free in Jesus Christ our Master. Amen.”

The next Diakonia World Assembly is scheduled to meet July 3-10, 2017.

Rev. Rick Tettau serves Faith Community United Methodist Church in Xenia, Ohio. This is the first in a series of reflections by deacons and diaconal ministers who attended the gathering with the assistance of a United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry grant.