Archives For deacons

The 2016 Book of Discipline has just become available in print, in Kindle format, and a free online version. Now is the time to renew your acquaintance with some key passages.

If you are an ordained United Methodist clergyperson, you should be familiar with The Book of Discipline. Some parts of it may not be of direct relevance to you. However, there are sections you need to know well in order to advocate for your ministry and educate others about the diaconate.

Here’s your guide to reviewing the Discipline.

Paragraphs 301-304: Ordination

Like many deacons, you may be asked why you don’t become a real minister or why you have to be ordained to do your ministry, or are told that the order of elder is “above” the order of deacon, etc. You need to be able to explain to people (and this may include your district superintendent, Board of Ordained Ministry, and elders) the meaning of ordination in the United Methodist Church.

The Discipline section on the origins of the diaconate is limited, so I recommend you read up on the history of the diaconate. You should also read the ordination ordinal–particularly the vows and the theological and liturgical introduction–which does a fuller job of presenting our theology of ordination. Among other things, it points out that ordination is significantly about the relationship of the ordained to the church:

Ordination of elders and deacons is both to an office and, when the ordained are later elected into full membership, for a lifetime of service. Ordination confers a new role in the life of the church as well as authority for leadership in specific forms of ministry. The new role of the ordained in the life of the church is claimed in relation to Christ and his call to leadership and service among the baptized for the life of the world. The authority given is exercised in stewardship of the mysteries of the gospel and of the church’s mission in the world. Ordination itself is ultimately the work of the Holy Spirit. . . . Upon ordination, ordained elders and deacons become accountable to the whole church, to the community of the ordained, and to the order of elders or deacons of which they are a part. [Services for the Ordering of Ministry in The United Methodist Church, 2017-2020, as Revised by Action of the 2016 General Conference (The United Methodist Publishing House, 2016), p. 7; emphasis added]

As you read, identify key words and phrases that define ordination. That will help you in your interpretative work.

Paragraphs 305-309: Clergy Orders

In the United Methodist Church, clergy orders are not just categories, but also covenant communities. Read these paragraphs to learn how you DeaconDiscipline2.best.smare accountable to your order and what your order could be doing to support the ministries of its members.

Paragraphs 310-314: Candidacy

Are you a certified candidate, or pursuing candidacy, for ordination? Are you a candidacy mentor? Read these paragraphs to better understand the process. Do not passively wait for someone to define it for you. They may be mistaken. And you may have to advocate for due process for yourself or the candidate you are mentoring.

Paragraphs 324-327, 330: Education and Provisional Membership

If you are in process toward ordination or are a clergy mentor, read these paragraphs to understand the educational requirements for ordination.

If you are a provisional member, read these paragraphs so you understand the process, how you may be appointed, voting rights, and ordination requirements. Again, do not passively wait for someone to define this for you. They may be mistaken. And you may have to advocate for due process for yourself or for a provisional member you are mentoring.

Paragraphs 328-329: Deacon Ministry, Authority, and Responsibilities

These paragraphs spell out our roles of clergy leadership in church and community as well as voting rights. While elders order the life of the congregation and church, deacons lead the faithful to live out their baptismal vows in their communities, workplaces, etc.

Note that the process for requesting the responsibility to preside at communion or baptism has changed a bit (see paragraph 328). The bishop in the area where the deacon is appointed is responsible for deciding on a deacon’s request for such responsibility. (Note that presiding is a responsibility and not “a right” or “authority.”)

Paragraph 331: Appointment Settings, Pay, Benefits

Read through this paragraph so you are clear about where and how deacons serve in primary or secondary appointments, in congregations or beyond the local church. You’ll find here:

  • Places of appointment
  • Requesting appointment
  • “Secondary” appointments
  • Initiating a ministry
  • Pay and benefits
  • Charge conference membership
  • Process for termination from a church appointment

Paragraph 349: Evaluation Process

General Conference 2016 approved a new evaluation process for clergy. It’s rather detailed so it is worth reading paragraph 349 in its entirety. Your annual conference has three years to develop and initiate a plan, so it may not begin until Jan. 2, 2020. You will want to know, however, what lies ahead.

Paragraph 350: Continuing Education

You have rights and responsibilities to take spiritual growth leaves. Learn how to request and account for fulfilling these opportunities.

Paragraphs 351-356: Leaves

There are a number of voluntary and involuntary leaves. Before you request one, find out what they entail and ask for the one you need. General Conference 2016 limited Transitional Leave to just one year. If you are between appointments, you may want to request a Personal Leave (paragraph 353.2a) instead.

Paragraph 356: Retirement

If you are approaching retirement, read this paragraph to learn when and how to ask for this relationship with the conference.

Paragraph 359: “Ineffectiveness” Remediation

If a bishop believes you are ineffective in your ministry, the bishop is required to follow a process to identify what she or he sees as your shortcomings and develop with you a plan for improvement. Know the process so you can fully understand the steps and make sure they are not overlooked.

Paragraphs 361-362: Complaint Procedures

There is a fair process for discontinuance of provisional membership, involuntary leaves or retirements, and administrative location (paragraph 359–see above). Likewise, there is one for complaints that a clergyperson has violated the sacred trust of the people. Even if you do not anticipate facing any of these situations, it is still worth the time to read through paragraphs. You may one day be on the Board of Ordained Ministry, or find yourself counseling a colleague. Again, know the process so you can advocate for your or others’ rights.

The Social Principles (Part V)

Given that the deacon’s ministry is one of compassion and justice, the Social Principles are among our key resources. It is worth reviewing these to refresh your memory as well as noting if there have been changes since you last read them. Many claims are made about what the Social Principles say; know how to check the facts.

Carve out a couple of hours to read these paragraphs. (It probably won’t take even that long.) Don’t be in the vulnerable position of asking others what The Discipline says and risk being told something inaccurate. And by knowing the Discipline, you will be a helpful guide for others as well.

By Rev. Lois Rogers-Watson

Many thanks to the Board of Higher Education and Ministry for the financial help I received toward attending the DOTAC 2015 meeting in Porto Alegre, Brazil! What a rich experience it was!

Lois Rogers-Watson

Lois Rogers-Watson

Highlights of the Conference for me were several. First of all, the worship was deeply spiritual. It was well planned and executed. Our music leader was exceptionally fine and the chosen music was not only beautiful and easy to sing but it was theologically sound, in my humble opinion. Naturally, we servant leaders identified with the call to serve and to work for justice about which both the music and the liturgy spoke.

The evening worship services led by Lutherans were truly beautiful. We United Methodists could learn from the liturgies of other denominations. Our Anglican heritage speaks to me and I yearn at times for the orders of the day. In our personal devotions, my husband and I have a somewhat “order of the day” that is both challenging and satisfying.

Another highlight was the fellowship. To sit at a table with the same people for the entire conference was very special because one felt that you became a community and I appreciated each of my tablemates very much. They were diverse and yet we had so much in common. I came to love these people! Each is obviously a devoted disciple of Christ and each works in different but wonderful ways in their home communities. We only had one Portuguese person at our table and it would have enhanced our fellowship to have another but our dear sister was so lovely and I came to identify with her at a deep level.

Likewise, to interact at meal times with conference participants was special as well. Those of us who did the site visits together also had the opportunity to develop relationships through our shared experiences there.

The site visits were, indeed, a highlight. Our first site was similar but not the same as Ronald McDonald Houses in the USA. This site was more modest but certainly faith-based and that came through in several ways. Operated on a shoestring, it is providing housing for those awaiting transplants and/or checkups following transplants. The director is loving and enthusiastic about her work. The second site was the “Bread Project,” which is also exciting. Youth from distressed neighborhoods spend half a day three days a week at this project. They learn to bake and they learn computer skills. In addition, they take far-reaching field trips which expand their horizons beyond their neighborhoods and city. The staff at this site is very fine and well-skilled. They receive government funding and I pray that will continue because it is making a huge difference in the lives of these young people. While we were there a mother came to enroll her child because she has seen the results of the program in the lives of youth she knows. It, too, is faith-based and it is located in a church which gives not only space to it but also spiritual support.

The speakers were also inspiring. It happens I have not been in many situations where I needed translation and I found that to be an excellent experience. My language skills, despite some language study, are very, very poor outside the English language and I am humbled by those who are fluent in various languages beyond their native ones.

Lois Rogers-Watson stands by the UMC Deacons banner used in the opening processional at the DOTAC conference.

Lois Rogers-Watson stands by the UMC Deacons banner used in the opening processional at the DOTAC conference.

The content of the talks by these able speakers spoke to my heart. They underscored readings that I have recently done and just reaffirmed my commitment to justice activities. So many are eating bread crumbs in our world today! So many don’t even get the crumbs. We must take back the Kingdom in our churches and help our churches see that our call is to be counter-cultural. Fortunately, my current pastor gets that to some extent and I know I am looked to as the speaker for social justice. But, I need to be even a stronger voice and this conference helped equip me in that role.

It was my privilege to present a workshop on Israel and Palestine at the conference. Though attendance was light at the workshop, I pray that attendees saw the injustices of the occupation of Palestine and left with a determination to learn more and to speak out for the Palestinian people while at the same time praying for the Israeli government to change its ways.

Finally, while in the country of Brazil, friends and I took advantage of some travel after the conference. We went to Iguacu Falls, Salvador, and Rio de Janeiro. Since Brazil is the fifth largest country in the world, we hardly saw a speck of it but nonetheless we learned a great deal from the various guides we had and the other people with whom we interacted. It was our privilege to meet Diana, a lovely young Methodist woman, in Salvador. All with whom we talked were discouraged by the corruption of their government and some of the stories they shared were not unlike things happening in the United States. It is time for the crumbs to become full communion in Brazil, the United States, and the world at large!

Many thanks again for helping make my pilgrimage possible. It was deeply spiritually, culturally, and socially enhancing and I thank God for it.
Rev. Rogers-Watson is a retired deacon and retired home missionary serving in East Lake United Methodist Church, Palm Harbor, Florida. She is a Stephen Minister and is involved in justice ministries on the local level and also an active advocate for ending the occupation of Palestine. She is a member of the Indiana Conference and an associate member of the Florida Conference.

Mission to vs. mission with

Deacons —  September 16, 2014

By Erica Koser

In ministry, I am passionate about two things: social justice and youth ministry. As I journey toward commissioning as a deacon, I find that these two passions continue to define my call to ministry and have pushed me to ask some important questions about how we serve others and how we attempt to be in mission with others. What is our driving motivation? Are we offering compassion but forgetting to continue on toward justice? Are our acts of compassion firmly rooted in a life of discipleship?

Erica Koser cropped

Erica Koser

In my ministry as youth director, one of the cornerstones is the short-term mission trip. I start receiving glossy fliers in my mailbox about this time of year, encouraging me to gather my youth and jet off to a tropical locale to serve others while having the adventure of a lifetime. The brochures are full of pictures of happy teens beaming at the camera and holding paint brushes, next to headlines that proclaim that these youth are changing the world.

Oh, were it that simple! What the brochures don’t show is the impact that our invasion may be having on the local community.

An old proverb says, “Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime.” An issue with many short-term mission trips is that we spend most of our time handing out fish. Week after week a new group brings fish—sometimes brightly colored fish, sometimes fish presented with a song and dance—but it’s always fish. The people receiving the fish smile and thank the givers of the fish only to turn and throw the fish in to the trash because nobody took the time to discover that the community can’t use fish. Robert Lupton, in his book Toxic Charity (HarperOne, 2012), lists these misperceptions of many mission trips:

“Contrary to popular belief, most mission trips and service projects do not:

  • Empower those being served
  • Engender healthy cross cultural relationships
  • Improve local quality of life
  • Relieve poverty
  • Change the lives of participants
  • Increase support for long-term mission work

Contrary to popular belief, most mission trips and service projects do:

  • Weaken those being served
  • Foster dishonest relationships
  • Erode recipients work ethic
  • Deepen dependency”
A short-term memory

Handing out fish can challenge us in the moment, but later, after we have washed the fishy smell from our hands, it is too easy to resume life as we know it, and the time, the money, and the effort we have spent on our short-term mission trip doesn’t have the effect on the community or on the youth that we desired.

As deacons called to a ministry of word and service, I think we are uniquely equipped to shift this paradigm and find ways that we ground our acts of compassion in a life of true discipleship.

I studied this issue intently as I wrote my graduate thesis. How do we engage in mission in such a way that we go out and make disciples in the world while also deepening our own discipleship? How do we live out John Wesley’s three General Rules to do no harm, to do good, and to stay in love with God (as Bishop Rueben Job words it)? I have found that if we shift to an attitude of accompaniment and ground it firmly in the cornerstones of covenant discipleship, we can facilitate and nurture the kind of discipleship we are called to in the great commission.

This past year I began using the cornerstones of covenant discipleship with our confirmation class. As the youth became more comfortable with working their way around the Jerusalem cross each week, sharing their acts of compassion, justice, worship, and devotion, they began to see how each strand wove together to deepen their understanding of discipleship. Compassion could not happen without also looking towards justice and understanding how mission and service were thin without practices of worship and devotion. They began to see that as they accompanied each other, they learned from one another as well as challenged each other. The seeds that were planted in the youth room were ready to be harvested and re-sown on the short-term mission trip.

Working alongside

For the past three summers, our youth group has traveled to Harvest Farm in Colorado. Harvest Farm is an addiction recovery farm on the plains of Northern Colorado. They serve a population of men who have been homeless or incarcerated and have lived a life of addiction. The men come to the farm to work the land, learn about the unconditional love of God, and begin to see a different way to live. And while it may seem an odd place to bring a group of youth for a mission experience, it has been a place that has changed us all for the better. This year, the youth arrived with a clearer picture of mission. They were not there to simply hand out fish. They were there to stand in the water with the other and to fish together. The water we stood in took the shape of dairy barns and pastures, corn fields and goat pens. The youth worked alongside the men, listening to their stories and sharing some of their own. Issues of homelessness and addiction began to take on names and faces—and acts of compassion led to ways to address injustices.

As we have returned home, we have continued to accompany the men from the farm. We have exchanged letters, held each other in prayer, and shared the ways in which we saw God at work during our week together. Our trip certainly wouldn’t have made a glossy brochure but God’s work often isn’t glamorous.

As deacons we are called to take the church out into the world, and in so doing we are called to ask the hard questions. Who are we serving? How are we serving? Is the work we are doing weaving together the threads of compassion, justice, worship, and devotion? There is a rich tapestry waiting to be woven as we accompany the other as Jesus’ hands and feet in the world today.

Erica Koser is a certified candidate for ordained ministry (deacon track) in the Minnesota Annual Conference. She is director of children, youth, and family ministry at Centenary United Methodist Church in Mankato, Minnesota.